The top 10 foods richest in lactose?

 

If so many foods labelled 'lactose-free' are appearing, it's because many consumers are prone to lactose intolerance (the sugar in milk, a complex carbohydrate that becomes increasingly difficult to digest over the years). This is also due to the omnipresence of lactose in the modern diet. It is supposed to be assimilated by lactase, an enzyme produced by the small intestine, lactose causes uncomfortable symptoms such as bloating, abdominal pain and flatulence in cases of intolerance or 'alactasia'.

 

Yet lactose is even present in flavoured crisps and in 20% medicines, as a texturising agent, preservative or excipient. Lactolerance reveals the top 10 foods richest in lactose, to be eaten in moderation if you suffer from the undesirable effects associated with alactasia.

 

Powdered milk

Powdered milk beats many records for lactose content, with around 51g of lactose per 100g of finished product in the skimmed version. It is nevertheless aimed at children, who are very rarely affected by lactose intolerance, unlike adults.

 

Condensed milk

At 9.5 to 12.5g of lactose per 100g of finished product, condensed milk is unquestionably one of the least recommended foods for lactose intolerant people. By way of comparison, people suffering from partial lactose intolerance can consume up to 12g of lactose a day without suffering the digestive symptoms of alactasia.

 

Cow's milk

Lactose intolerance is, of course, synonymous with poor absorption of dairy products. Cow's milk is obviously one of the first dairy products to be affected, with 48g of lactose per litre. Products derived from cow's milk (rice pudding, ice cream, etc.) are also rich in lactose. Matin Léger" lactose-free milk is a good option if you want to replace your usual glass of cow's milk in your diet.

 

Goat's milk

Like cow's milk, goat's milk contains 48g of lactose per litre. So it's not one of the alternatives to choose if you're lactose intolerant. Instead, opt for lactose-reduced cow's milk or a plant-based drink made with almonds, oats, soya or rice.

 

Ewe's milk

Ewe's milk is not quite as bad as its two predecessors, but it still contains 46g of lactose per litre. It therefore belongs to the family of lactose-rich dairy products, which should be incorporated sparingly into your diet in the event of alactasia.

 

Cottage cheese and fromage frais

Not all cheeses are rich in lactose. A distinction is made between fresh cheeses with a high lactose content and semi-hard, extra-hard or hard cheeses, which contain only traces of lactose. Emmenthal cheese is preferable to cottage cheese in the case of alactasia.

 

The cream

Whether fresh or whipped, cream of animal origin contains between 2.5 and 4g of lactose per 100g of finished product. Butter, on the other hand, is low in lactose, with barely 1g per 100g of finished product.

 

Industrial yoghurts

Most plain and flavoured yoghurts in supermarkets contain lactose. Choose a plant-based version or prepare them at home to enjoy tasty desserts that suit your diet.

 

Milk chocolate

As a general rule, milk chocolate contains around 7.2g of lactose per 100g of finished product. In the case of alactasia, it is therefore advisable to considerably reduce your consumption of chocolate bars, spreads and other biscuits filled with milk chocolate.

 

Charcuterie

Sausages, black or white puddings, sausages, pâtés: all these foods are made from lactose, which guarantees their compact texture and good keeping qualities. In some cases, cooked meats contain more lactose than cheese! If you're lactose intolerant and a fan of charcuterie, opt for cured ham, whole foie gras and most cured hams.

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